Ocean FAD Articles > Peaceful Protest against IUU Driftnet Fishing

US Albacore Fishermen Protest in Monterey Bay, CA
15 Jan 2012

                        Sustainable Tuna trollers "Ocean Joy" & "Wet & Wild"

 After a long hard season Trolling for Albacore Tuna in 2011, F/V "Ocean Joy" and F/V "Wet & Wild" take up their winter slips in Moss Landing, Monterey Bay. Overall fishing was spotty this year as production fell to 50% of last years take. General consciences was "too many boats and not enough fish"

OFAD decided to alert the public of the devistation that comes from IUU driftnet fishing, by hanging banners up in the rigging of F/V "Ocean Joy" in hopes to gain some interest.

Square Rigger "Lady Washington" sailed down from Westport Washington to have public tours conducted on the end slip just next to us. We received many comments and inquiries to the situation. All was well worth it!

       

                         Sign petition to Ban IUU Driftnets banner Sustainable Tuna Fisherman fed up

Seeing this old sailing ship brought back memories of the birth of the TROLLING method of fishing. It is known that sailing ships, such as "Lady Washington" would put out Hand-Lines, trailing behind the boat, to catch fish for their meals. Around the turn of the century, many sailing boats took up Albacore Tuna Trolling. This sailing schooner, "Hispaniola" was built in 1929. Sailing vessels had to have lots of sail up to make good speed to get the Tuna to bite.

       Sailing Schooner Tuna Troller

It was a great honor to be parked up next to this old Sailing Tuna Troller. The Hispaniola was known to be a "Tuna Slayer" on the west coast. As She showed signs of needed work on her decks, and the owner had taken ill just lately, I agreed to lend a hand by re-caulking her.

         

Then poor hot tar down her seems to make her water tight. As you can see, it's a sloppy job. Here I am scraping the excess tar off the wooden planks to make the surface smooth again. Lots of elbow grease.

 

     

After a month of pounding, pouring, and scraping tar, we are ready to seal the decks again. Boats need a lot of work to keep them maintained, especially ones made of wood.

John Harder